courage

Day 16 Create A Life You Love: The Operator

The Operator

The Operator by Robert O’Neill is a riveting book that all Americans would benefit from reading. O’Neill is an honest and graphic storyteller opening the reader’s eyes to the reality of what it takes to be the best of the best in US Military operations. These men sacrifice everything, including their lives to protect our great country so that you have the opportunity to Create A Life You Love. Don’t ever take this for granted.

O’Neill didn’t plan on signing up to be a Navy Seal, but as fate would have it he ended up squarely in the middle of one of the world’s most intense military training programs.  In his book, he describes in excruciating detail the unimaginable training that Navy Seals go through to prepare for the most deadly military missions on Earth.  During his time as a counter-terror expert, he went on over 400 missions in some of the most God-forsaken areas of the planet.

And finally, he talks about being the shooter of Osama bin Laden.  Days before the mission he and his seal mates wrote letters to loved ones and discussed the fact that they would likely not survive the assignment.  The task did not go as planned and so his team had to adjust to one of their helicopters going down and a handful of other unexpected occurrences.  If you haven’t read this book, do.  If you have read it, give it to someone who hasn’t.

https://youtu.be/Bh3ZwiBsI-k Stay true and be

Frontiers of Possibility

Frontiers of Possibility

The well-known poet, Rilke once said, “Being here is so much.” I agree, it really, really is. However, the human condition crowds out the frequency of which most of us reflect on those five significant words.

The traditional structures of family, parenting, community, and communication have become increasingly unsure. We lose sight of the reliable presence and repetitions of the stars, sun, moon, and seasons. Our lives become predictable, and our behaviors become routine and mindless. We lose ourselves in the daily mechanical functioning of our lives. We take the same route to the office each day; we park in the same parking spot, we eat our meals at the same time and often eat the same thing over and over again, we interact with friends and colleagues with little presence or creativity, and we rarely step out of our comfort zone. We begin to develop patterns of thinking which render us incapable of feeling or thinking with any authenticity and refinement. We have handed much of our daily living over to Smartphones, busyness, and mindless consumption. And all of this is why Rilke’s quote goes unexamined.

Don’t Wait For Tragedy

Alas, it is only when something throws a wrench into our drone-like existence that we wake up to the fact that ‘Being here is so much.’ It is the diagnosis of a terminal illness, the unexpected death of a loved one, the loss of a job, or some other sudden disruption of our comfort and familiarity that awakens us to